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Author Topic: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian  (Read 7307 times)

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Satyr

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2019, 07:25:58 PM »
We ended the last post with a question left unanswered: how might we use John Dee's “Fundamental Prayer” in our own ritual work? Unfortunately, there may not be a single, simple answer. We need not feel bad about it, though. Dee was at a loss as well, as when seeking guidance from the angel Ave [MS Cotton Appendix I, leaves 202 (back) to 201 (back). “Δ” is Dee. “EK” is Edward Kelly.]:

Quote
Δ - As you best know: we need instructions yet, necessary for us

Ave - Very few.

Ave - It is a stemm, with frute, but it wanteth leaves.

EK - What mean you by that?

Ave - There be more frute than leaves, and in many actions there be more circumstances than matter

Δ - But here is only marrow, and no bones or flesh.

That was a week after Kelly's initial vision of the watchtowers. The angels expected Dee to write a book of invocations and he was still unsure how to proceed. He attempted to pry more answers out of the angels in later sessions, but with little success. For example, 2 July 1584 [Ibid, leaf 196 (back)]:

Quote
Δ - 5 - As concerning the etymology of these names of god, we would be satisfied

Ave - God is a spirit, and is not hable to be comprehended

Δ - Some Notifying or declaration, no full comprehension I require.

Ave - It is no part of man's understanding. They signify all things, and they signifye nothing. Who can express Jehoua what it signifieth. Deus significat ad id quod agit (“God means what it does.”)

Except for Raphael's revision of the “Great Table” in 1587, Dee was left primarily to his own devices. There is no evidence that he made use of the invocations he wrote. And after the revision, it does not appear that he made an attempt to make sense of the changes Raphael made or their consequences.

That makes it challenging for us when we try to adapt Dee's material for our own use. Even when we feel somewhat confident that we understand his thinking, we cannot always be certain his interpretation was what the angels intended. This is especially true when we consider that the grimoire we have (Sloane MS 3191) was written primarily before Raphael's revision. We must consider whether to take into account information that Dee eventually possessed, but never used.

So it is with the “Fundamental Prayer”. We must first try to understand how Dee interpreted the material, writing as he did before Raphael's revision. Dee begins as one might reasonably expect: “O IEOVAH ZEBAOTH”. We might recognize this as the god-name associated with Netzach, the seventh sphere of the “Tree of Life” and associated with the planet Venus (777, Table I, Col V, Key Scale 7. See also, for example, “The Scale of the Number Ten” in Donald Tyson's, Three Books of Occult Philosophy: written by Henry Cornelius Agrippa. Llewellyn Publications: St Paul, Minnesota: 1993. pp 288-289). In our last post, I discussed how Venus is a fitting planetary ruler for the element of earth, and how Dee's system seems to agree.


“John Dee his Note”, Sloane MS 3188, leaf 6 (front). See also “The Center for Enochian Studies”, Volume I, number 2, in Thelema Lodge Calendar for March 1988 ev. Thelema Lodge, Ordo Templi Orientis: Berkeley, California, 1988).

In a diagram inscribed at the beginning of Mysteriorum Liber Primus [Sloane MS 3188, leaf 6 (front)], Dee explicitly sets Annael (akin to Haniel - and variations, associated with Venus) over the archangels we commonly associate with the four quarters: Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, and Uriel. Yahweh Tzabaoth, therefore, seems a fitting god-name to invoke when Dee began, or indeed when we begin, to call upon the angels of the watchtowers.

The bulk of Dee's prayer is essentially late 16th-century “legalese”. It reads a bit like a business contract. This tells us something about how Dee approached these particular spirits, and may suggest how we should approach them ourselves. What concerns us most at the moment, though, is the order in which he set up the banners. As we saw in the last post, Dee appears to have used the God-names in the order in which they were received. This seems like a reasonable choice. It also expresses Tetragrammaton (clockwise, from the west), and this may have been appealing in light of Ave's comment about Jehovah.

However, though I have used his prayer many times, I have never set up banners using Dee's original order. When I began moving away from Golden-Dawn style Enochian, and towards an interpretation closer to Dee's, David Jones suggested I move the banners to their correct positions when incorporating the prayer. I naturally understood this to mean setting up banners in the order air, fire, water, earth, clockwise, beginning east of northeast. The Golden Dawn placed the banners in the same quarters.

I set up the banners this way for some time. David then suggested that I swap north and west, placing the earth banners in the west and water banners in the north. This produces an interesting arrangement.

Air in the east and earth in the west, water in the north and fire in the south, is the elemental arrangement of the “Hall of the Neophytes” (See the “Neophyte 0=0 Grade of the Order of the Stella Matutina”, in Israel Regardie, The Golden Dawn, sixth edition. Llewellyn Publications: St Paul, Minnesota, 2002. pp 116-133). The station of Frater Dadouchos is in the south and symbolizes “Heat and Dryness” (Ibid, p 118). The station of Frater Stolistes is in the north and symbolizes “Cold and Moisture” (Ibid, p 119). And when Frater Kerux, with his lamp, leads the circumambulations (Ibid, p 120 and elsewhere), he begins in the northeast, roughly where we begin setting up our twelve banners.

Using this configuration as an example, we might incorporate the “Fundamental Prayer” into our opening as follows. After preparing ourselves, banishing, and purifying and consecrating our space, we could stand in the middle facing east and read or recite Dee's prayer, substituting our name for his. When we come to the twelve names, move to the northeast and stand at the edge of the circle facing outward for a moment. Move right along the circle to a point a little north of east. Facing outward again, vibrate “oro” three times. Move around to the east, face outward, and vibrate “ibah” four times. Moving to a point a little south of east, face outward again, and vibrate “aozpi” five times.

Continue around to a point a little east of south, and facing outward vibrate “oip” three times. Then move around to the south, face outward, and vibrate “teaa” four times. Then move to a little west of south, face outward, and vibrate “pdoce” five times. And so on in like manner around the circle, vibrating “mor” south of west, “dial” in the west, “hctga” north of west, “mph” west of north, “arsl” in the north, and “gaiol” east of north. I found it difficult at first, but try to space the banners evenly around the circle. After vibrating the last God-name five times, continue around to the northeast and complete the circle. Pause facing outward for a moment, then return to the center and finish the prayer.

I usually substitute silence for “Jesus Christ”, but it is a matter of personal taste. The prayer might be reworded (compare for example the translation in The Enochian Evocation of Dr John Dee, by Geoffrey James. Heptangle Books: Gillette, New Jersey, 1984. p 120), or we might eliminate the prayer altogether and just set up the banners in whatever order we choose by simply repeating their names around the circle.

From the standpoint of our GD inheritance, this opening makes sense. The aspirant was first admitted to the “Hall of the Neophytes” before subsequent initiations into the four elemental grades. If we perform the above opening with Dee's prayer before setting up watchtowers, then we would be erecting our metaphysical temple in roughly the same order.

There remains at least one other possible arrangement of the twelve banners that bears consideration. Dee apparently wrote his “Fundamental Prayer” without knowledge of Raphael's revised “Great Table”. We cannot say whether this would have changed Dee's thinking, but we may speculate on how the revision might affect the order of the banners.

The order in which Dee read the God-names from the quadrants of the original “Great Table” - top-left, top-right, bottom-left, bottom-right - makes a z-shaped pattern on the table. If we apply this z-formula to Raphael's reformed table, we read oro, ibah, aozpi, mph, arsl, gaiol, mor, dial, hctga, oip, teaa, pdoce. This order, if applied the same way Dee applied the original order, would place the banners of air in the east, those of earth in the west, the banners of fire in the north, and those of water in the south. This, we may recall, is the same elemental arrangement implied in the Sefer Yetzirah, an arrangement associated with the order of creation. All things considered, this also seems to be a compelling way to set up banners.

As for pronunciation of the God-names, I fear we are mostly on our own. I can only suggest forms with which I have grown comfortable myself (more-or-less English pronunciation):

Quote
oro: or-oh
ibah: ee-bah-ay
aozpi: ah-ohz-pee

mph: em-pay
arsl: ar-sahl
gaiol: gah-ee-ol

mor: mor
dial: dee-ahl
hctga: hek-tay-gah

oip: oh-eep
teaa: tay-ah-ah
pdoce: peh-doh-kay

The Golden Dawn had their own idiosyncratic system of pronunciation (See Regardie 2002, p 650). The student will have to make up their own mind what pronunciation seems right to them and their ear. In the above, when I say “vibrate”, I mean intone, sing, that sort of thing. Performing the “Enterer” and all that would soon be tiresome.

Vibrating in this sense is a simple technique, but sometimes difficult to describe. Regardie attempted to illustrate how this should sound to the person vibrating using a little experiment (The Complete Golden Dawn System of Magic. Falcon Press: Phoenix, Arizona, 1984. Volume Five, p 57):

Quote
Take an ordinary piece of dining flatware - a long spoon or knife or fork, or what not. It makes no difference. So long as it is a metal and can transmit vibrations readily, that is all that is required. Now take a long piece of ordinary string, about forty inches long. Wrap the middle of this string securely around the spoon (or whatever), leaving the ends free. Hold each end between thumb and forefinger - one end in both right and left hands - and leaning over, swing the spoon against the edge of a table. Listen to the sound it makes. Depending on the flatware and the table, a certain sound will be struck. Take note of it.

Having done this, take one end of the string and wrap it around the middle phalanx of the index finger. Do this on both the right and left sides. Then insert the tips of the fingers involved into the ear, lightly. Repeat the same experiment of swinging the spoon so that it hits against a table or desk. Now determine what kind of sound this spoon makes in the ear. I must confess it rather surprised me when I first performed this little experiment.

The resultant sound bears little relation to the first sound. It is more like the pealing of cathedral bells. Repeat this several times, so that your impression is most clear, and hence can be recalled.

 Regardie proposed that we should hum, with our mouth open, when vibrating:

Quote
It is solely my recommendation that the humming be employed with the Order's method of vibrating the divine Names, knowing full well from this experiment what the full effect of the formula produces. In all other instances of intoning the various names - as in the Pentagram and Hexagram rituals - follow all the rules and methods described in this paper by the Order. But when breathing out the Name, as described above, hum it out. Do not try to pronounce or vibrate the Name clearly. Hum the Name. But as you hum, clearly visualize, or have the mental intention that such and such a Name is being vibrated while you hum.

If you find yourself in doubt about what we mean, find a spoon and some string and try this experiment for yourself. When vibrating properly, it can feel as if your entire skull were vibrating.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2019, 09:43:47 PM by Satyr »

paragate

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2019, 04:46:33 PM »
Dr Dee's order comes from the Z-pattern on the original table, the Yetziratic order from the Z-pattern on the reformed table. The Hall of Neophytes order appears to come from applying the Z pattern counterclockwise from the reformed table. To me this suggests one last option, which is to use apply the Z-pattern of the original table counterclockwise, which yields air in the east, water in the south, fire in the west, and earth in the north which is reflected from the dispersed order of the tribes (the original diagram shows air in the west). Also, Dr Dee's order establishes IHVH clockwise from the west while the Reversed Diasporic order does so counterclockwise from the west. If the reformed and original tables are used in different contexts, perhaps this order is analogous to the "Hall of the Neophytes" for the original order of creation, pre-Diaspora.

Satyr

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2019, 12:00:42 AM »
Dr Dee's order comes from the Z-pattern on the original table, the Yetziratic order from the Z-pattern on the reformed table. The Hall of Neophytes order appears to come from applying the Z pattern counterclockwise from the reformed table.

The Hall of the Neophytes seems to derive from Freemasonry, or that is where you will find its closest relative. If the Hierophant sits in the east (obvious, really), and the candidate is admitted in the west, then that leaves water and fire and the directions north and south unassigned. Fire in the south seems a more obvious choice when constructing a ritual in northern Europe.

There is probably no need to look toward Enochian when the mechanics of the initiation process determines the arrangement of the lodge.

Quote
If the reformed and original tables are used in different contexts, perhaps this order is analogous to the "Hall of the Neophytes" for the original order of creation, pre-Diaspora.

There is a distinct possibility the original table is not used at all. The narrative arc of the system seems to be away from the Biblical order found in the book of Numbers and towards major elements of Revelation, including the New Jerusalem. The tribes will be arranged around the City in the dispersed order, and probably enter its twelve gates in the same way.

Setting up banners in the order of the Hall of the Neophytes is an adaptation of Enochian, and not something suggested by the system itself. I would call it “Neo-Golden-Dawn”. It suggests how we might use Enochian, but does not tell us anything about the system itself.

Lumi

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2019, 12:17:02 PM »
The three subsystems of Enochian are interconnected. This makes it challenging to keep the different plains or realms separate in your mind.

This is intentional.It is an initiatory trigger. All three subsystems are different dissections of the same space/plain/realm. Each aspect, with it's own geometry and numerology is a demonstration of a set of aspects and principles.

Also there is a precise construction to his symbols/hieroglyphs. You can't just go and start switching the direction of elements. Hall of the Neophyte is of a lower order than opening by Watchtower. So long as there is light, and the initiate takes care not to get in over their head, the central point between light and darkness is relatively safe . The problem is that the introduction to liminal space that is the hall of the neophyte is simply a starting point and as the initiates power/insight increase so does the danger. 

Lumi

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #19 on: September 25, 2019, 12:39:51 PM »
To further clarify, I would be exceptionally careful about doing anything middle pillar, like focusing your consciousness through your voice, before Opening by watchtower has been sufficiently understood and beneficial. It shouldn't matter in the actual WT rite , because elementals dont particularly have names and are readily available, but the dangers that the ritual element of WT is meant to habituate you against are ever present if you are attuning yourself to stuff with out the requisite ability to judge the nature of an entity.

Satyr

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2019, 04:06:39 PM »
All three subsystems are different dissections of the same space/plain/realm.

There is some overlap, but the elemental realm is not the same space (or plain or realm) as, for example, the supernals.

Quote
Each aspect, with it's own geometry and numerology is a demonstration of a set of aspects and principles.

Numerology?

Quote
Also there is a precise construction to his symbols/hieroglyphs. You can't just go and start switching the direction of elements.

I do not recommend anyone “start switching the direction of elements” willy-nilly

To further clarify, I would be exceptionally careful about doing anything middle pillar, like focusing your consciousness through your voice, before Opening by watchtower has been sufficiently understood and beneficial.

I do not recommend the Middle Pillar.

An understanding of the watchtowers is precisely what is in question. And is, incidentally, the purpose of this thread currently in progress.

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It shouldn't matter in the actual WT rite , because elementals dont particularly have names

How can you claim expertise and not know that the Great Table is literally composed of the names of elementals?

Except for the Black Cross, of course.

pantare

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2019, 06:08:44 AM »
Keys 3-6 each preceded by the 1st done. I ran through air and water using the GD style pronunciations to no effect. However, at earth I switched to the direct enochian transliteration and was affected explicitly. Earth being the first successful key, I returned to air, and continued through water then fire in reverse tetragrammaton. Following IHVH rather than Dee's order was satisfying enough because I ended up at earth first circumstantially. So:

Earth performed before bed using only the keys and elemental pentagrams without more structured ritual. Left me focused, confident, steady, but heavy and overly serious. The following day I felt inert and depressive. Reminiscent of smoking an indica.

For air I included the GD temple opening properly. Focus again, but more levity and creativity. Physically I felt lighter. Thoughts came easy and quickly, but so did anxiety. I called on Raphael and he answered quickly. Stressful dreams at night, and strong anxiety the next day. Like a bad reaction to a sativa. That being said, I saw into some issues I've been having.

At water I included the Watchtower rite before the proper GD openings. Far better experience, the anxiety left over from air washed away. While  I can't say I was explicitly emotional, overall I felt good. After the rite the room felt gelatinous.

I followed with fire the next morning. The was rushed, and the effects less noticeable. I'll have to do a better dive into fire, but I feel returned to normal from the effects.

A few thoughts. I was shocked at how quickly and noticeable the effects were; I was absolutely certain when it worked. Air and earth were performed with little ritual, and I think my bad reactions (depression, anxiety) were due to a lack of structure in ritual and the seepage therein. The effects of water and fire were subtler, and I'm not sure if that was because of me, or their respective nature.

Also, I don't know if it's because of the work, but I felt pretty drained in the four days this took. That may be why fire didn't affect me as much.

I didn't evoke any particular angels, just dipped into each tablet. So I think that should be the next step. But I don't know which angels to be aiming at, the seniors seem least daunting in terms of quantity.

Satyr

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2019, 05:45:51 PM »
The following day I felt inert and depressive. Reminiscent of smoking an indica.

Yes. Watchtowers can get heavy in the same way, especially when invoked in depth. The feeling is fairly obvious.

This was all quite good. Thanks for sharing.

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A few thoughts. I was shocked at how quickly and noticeable the effects were; I was absolutely certain when it worked.

Exactly so!

This is something positive to be gained from working with the elemental keys. You develop a feel for when something has opened for you. It is subtle, but unmistakable once you have experienced it a few times. This is a very useful sense to have when you start working with æthyrs, and success is not always assured.

Quote
Also, I don't know if it's because of the work, but I felt pretty drained in the four days this took.

For lack of a better word, magic takes ‘power’. Power is accumulated in time (through yoga, meditation, etc) and power is drained or depleted through magical work. It's one reason we choose our work wisely, or try to do so.

Nubti

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #23 on: September 29, 2019, 06:07:50 PM »
For lack of a better word, magic takes ‘power’. Power is accumulated in time (through yoga, meditation, etc) and power is drained or depleted through magical work. It's one reason we choose our work wisely, or try to do so.

This is interesting to me, because it was recently explained to me that that's the reason why I have so many 'rest days' (aethyrs where little happens), where I am charged and stuff, in order to maintain momentum into the following aethyrs.

Seems oddly mercurial.

Satyr

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2019, 07:04:43 PM »
Updated 30 September 2019 because I confused myself.


The reformed “Great Table”. Sloane MS 3191, leaves 56 (back) to 57 (front).

Before we set up watchtowers, there are at least two questions that should be answered. It would be nice to know how to derive the relevant names from the tables and we need to know in which quarters, and in what order, to erect our watchtowers. This last answer may actually take some thought. The first answer is fairly straightforward. It was explained to Dee and Kelly  by Ave on Monday, 25 June 1584, using the tablet of air (the upper-left quadrant of the “Great Table”) as an example [MS Cotton Appendix I, leaf 201 (front)]:

Quote
Thou hast in the middle lyne, oroibAhaozpi
There are 6 lines above, and six below.
This lyne is called Linea Spiritus Sancti and out of that lyne cometh the three names of God, from the east gate, being of 3 4 and 5 letters. Which were the armes of the Ensignes that were spoken of before. oro, ibah, aozpi.

I said before, that God the father was a mighty piller divided with a right line

The father him self, with out the lyne,
The father and sonne by Division of the lyne

These two lynes begyning

fA
id
ar
 &c

That is the great Crosse that came out of the east gate

Δ - With that lyne of the holy ghost?

— I

Each quadrant - or tablet - is a table of twelve columns and thirteen rows. The middle row is called the “Line of the Holy Ghost”. It is from this row that three names of God are drawn from each quadrant.

The two central columns of a quadrant are together known as “God the father”, described as, “a mighty pillar”. Divided into two columns they are known as the “Father” and “Son”. Together, the middle row and two central columns form a “great cross”, and represent the mystery of the Trinity.

The name of the king of each watchtower is drawn from the center of its corresponding quadrant in a sort of spiral pattern beginning at the fifth letter in the middle row, counting from the left. In the upper-left quadrant of the “Great Table”, this letter is “b”. Moving from one letter to the next along this spiral, the second letter of the name is diagonally above and to the right (“a”). The third is the next letter to the immediate right (“T”). The fourth is the letter diagonally down and to the right (“a”). The fifth letter is diagonally down and to the left: (“i”). The sixth letter of the king's name is the next letter to the immediate left (“V”).

The first six letters are thus “baTaiV”, in the quadrant of air. There are two different ways of reading the seventh. Ordinarily, according to Ave, the seventh letter is directly above the sixth (in this example, “A”). But in extreme circumstances, we should use the letter diagonally above and to the right of the sixth letter (in this example, “h”). We thus have two names of seven letters each. In the quadrant of air, these are Bataiva and Bataivh. Details of what Ave meant by “extreme circumstances”, however, were not necessarily forthcoming.

Reading from the reformed “Great Table”, we have for the kings (more-or-less English pronunciation):

Quote
Air: Bataiva or Bataivh (Bah-tah-ee-vah or Bah-tah-ee-vay)
Water: Raagios or Raagiol (Rah-ahg-ee-ohs or Rah-ahg-ee-ohl).
Earth: Iczhiha or Iczhihl (Ick-zah-hee-ha or Ick-zah-hee-ay-el).
Fire: Edlprna or Edlprna (Ay-del-per-nah).

Note that these are not the spellings used by the Golden Dawn (See Israel Regardie, The Golden Dawn, sixth edition. Llewellyn Publications: St Paul, Minnesota, 2002. pp 143, 156, and so on). Instead of choosing one spelling or the other for each king, they chose to use both final letters. Crowley did the same (See The Equinox, Volume I. Samuel Weiser: New York, New York, 1972. Number VII, p 235. No VIII, pp 106, 109, and 111).

The four names of these kings are said to each call forth six seniors [MS Cotton Appendix I, leaf 208 (front)]. The names of these seniors are drawn from the “lines” of the Father (column six), Son (column seven), and Holy Ghost (row seven, the middle row). Again using the upper-left quadrant of the “Great Table” as an example, the name of the first senior begins with the seventh letter of the middle row, counting from the left, and is read from right to left: “hAbioro” (Hah-bee-oh-ro).

The second begins with the sixth letter of the middle row, counting from the left, and is read upward: “Aaozaif” (Ah-ah-oh-zah-eef).

The third begins with the seventh letter of the middle row, counting from the left, and is also read upward: “hTmorda” (Het-mor-dah).

The name of the fourth begins with the sixth letter of the middle row, counting from the left, and is read from left to right: “Ahaozpi” (Ah-ha-ohz-pee).

The fifth begins with the seventh letter of the middle row, counting from the left, and is read downward: “hipotga” (Hee-pot-gah).

The name of the sixth senior begins with the sixth letter of the middle row, counting from the left, and is also read downward: “AVToTar” (Ah-oo-toe-tar).

These four kings and twenty-four seniors (six from each watchtower) are described in the fourth chapter of the book of Revelation (verses 1-4, 6-8a, emphasis mine):

Quote
After this I looked, and there before me was a door standing open in heaven. And the voice I had first heard speaking to me like a trumpet said, “Come up here, and I will show you what must take place after this.” At once I was in the Spirit, and there before me was a throne in heaven with someone sitting on it. And the one who sat there had the appearance of jasper and ruby. A rainbow that shone like an emerald encircled the throne. Surrounding the throne were twenty-four other thrones, and seated on them were twenty-four elders. They were dressed in white and had crowns of gold on their heads. … Also in front of the throne there was what looked like a sea of glass, clear as crystal.

In the center, around the throne, were four living creatures, and they were covered with eyes, in front and in back. The first living creature was like a lion, the second was like an ox, the third had a face like a man, the fourth was like a flying eagle. Each of the four living creatures had six wings and was covered with eyes all around, even under its wings.

The twenty-four seniors are the “twenty-four elders” seated around the throne, and the four kings are the “four living creatures”. The name of each “creature”, as we saw above, is drawn from the center of each elemental tablet and the names of the six seniors, radiating outward from the center, correspond to the creature's six wings. The appearances of the creatures - lion, ox, man, eagle - correspond to the cherubic zodiacal signs of Leo, Taurus, Aquarius, and Scorpio, respectively, and thus the cherubs of fire, earth, air, and water.


The Golden Dawn's “Tablet of Union”. From MS Cotton Appendix I, leaf 206 (front).

For now, the last set of names that will concern us is taken from what the Golden Dawn called the “Tablet of Union”. This table of four rows and five columns is used to create the black cross that binds together the four quadrants of the “Great Table”, and was believed by the Golden Dawn to be the key to the watchtowers. The four rows were attributed to the four watchtowers in the order air, water, earth, fire. The first column was attributed to spirit. The second through fifth columns were associated with the sub-quadrants of the tablets, and were attributed to the elements in the order air, water, earth, fire.

The five-letter names associated with air and fire (exarp and bitom) were used with the active pentagrams of spirit. The names associated with water and earth (hcoma and nanta) were used with the passive pentagrams of spirit (See Regardie 2002, p 281). Crowley did the same in the temple openings reproduced in his Liber Chanokh, Part II (The Equinox, Vol I, No VIII. pp 99-127).


Dee's “Biblical” and “Dispersed” orders of the twelve tribes of Israel. Sloane MS 3191, leaf 31 (front).

When John Dee wrote the prayers and invocations of Sloane MS 3191, he did not know the archangel Rafael would later rearrange the quadrants of the “Great Table”. As discussed previously, if you place the original “Great Table” in the center of Dee's “Biblical Order” diagram, and rotate the table until the upper-left quadrant (air) is pointing to the right (east), the elements of the quadrants align exactly with the elements of the zodiacal signs associated with the twelve tribes in the diagram.


Left, the Kings and Seniors. Right, Dee's invitation to the six Seniors of the east. Sloane MS 3191, leaves 58 (back) to 59 (front).

When Dee wrote his book, this is [close to] what he did. On the page of his grimoire where he tabulates the four kings, along with their respective seniors and quarters [Sloane MS 3191, leaf 58 (back)], we find him placing air in the east, earth in the south, water in the west, and fire in the north. This reflects the physical arrangement of the quadrants on the original “Great Table” as well as the “Biblical Order”.

If Dee believed his invocations should have been changed after the archangel Raphael directed Edward Kelly to rearrange the “Great Table”, we have no record of him doing so. If we were to follow Dee's example using the reformed “Great Table”, the resulting elemental arrangement - air in the east, fire in the west, earth in the north, and water in the south - might seem strange to us, but as we have learned this order would be in agreement with Dee's “Dispersed Order”, Agrippa, Revelation 4, and certain astrological alignments. For example at dawn on the vernal equinox fire (Ares) is in the east, water (Cancer) is in the north, air (Libra), is in the west, and earth (Capricorn) is in the south.

The observant student, however, might recall that Kelly's original vision, the one that started it all on that June morning of 1584, strongly suggested that the watchtowers stand where we expect to find them, where the Golden Dawn traditionally put them. This is neither the elemental arrangement Dee used in any of his prayers and invocations, nor the pattern we get when we apply Dee's reasoning to the reformed table.

As mentioned before, I strongly suspect a key to the system lies in the Sefer Yetzirah. If we are to assume the truth of Kelly's original vision, then it seems we should work backwards from that arrangement in search of a solution that places the watchtowers where Ave described them. I believe that, when working out the relationships between elements, directions, quadrants, and watchtowers, the directional cube of the Sefer Yetzirah (A Peter Hayman, Sefer Yeṣira. Mohr Siebeck: Tübingen, Germany, 2004. p 131) has the power to explain the elemental material we have, and the interpretation we received, in much the same way Agrippa's attributions explain some astronomical aspects of Dee's system.

As we have seen, early versions of the Sefer Yetzirah assign the seven “double letters” to the directions in a specific order. Beth is assigned to the center of a directional cube, and the remaining six letters are assigned to the directions up, down, east, west, north, and south, respectively. Assigning the seven planets to these seven directions in their natural order gives us Sol in the east and Venus in the west, Mercury in the north and Luna in the south for the four cardinal directions. This is the order of creation, and implies air in the east, earth in the west, fire in the north, and water in the south. This is also the elemental arrangement we get when we apply the order in which the four quadrants of the “Great Table” were originally received to the cardinal faces of the directional cube (east and west, north and south).

When we trace this “received” pattern on the reformed “Great Table” - top-left, top-right, bottom-left, bottom-right - and attribute the resulting elemental sequence to the cardinal faces of our directional cube, we get air in the east, water in the west, earth in the north, and fire in the south, just as in Kelly's vision. This is the arrangement of watchtowers we inherited from the Golden Dawn and, in my work, it seems correct.

The exact correspondence of the quadrants of the two “Great Tables” to Dee's two diagrams of the tribes is significant, and likely tells us something important about the relationship between the original and revised tables. However, given Kelly's vision, and Ave's explanation of it, I do not believe we are supposed to use either tribal diagram as a guide when setting up watchtowers. It seems to be a question of separate plains, celestial versus elemental.

Having decided where to set up our watchtowers there remains the question of what order in which to set up watchtowers. When the candidate passed through the elemental grades of the Golden Dawn, they were ritually exposed to the elements in the order of earth, air, water, fire, the order of Tetragrammaton except in reverse as they climbed the Tree toward Tiphareth. At least that was the theory. When Israel Regardie wrote his watchtower ritual (Ceremonial Magic: A Guide to the Mechanics of Ritual. The Aquarian Press: Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, 1980. p 35 and those following), he chose to set up watchtowers in the opposite order: fire, water, air, earth. It is likely that Regardie was merely following “The Consecration Ceremony of the Vault of the Adepti, with Watch-Tower Ceremony” (Regardie 2002, pp 264-279), which also called upon the angels of the watchtowers in the order fire, water, air, earth. I have used this order myself and had no problems.

As we have seen, John Dee seems to have always started in the east and invoked clockwise around the circle, whether he was using the received order of the watchtowers or the physical order of the watchtowers on the original “Great Table”. David Jones has argued that the elemental keys [Sloane MS 3191, leaves 4 (front) to 11 (back)] are attributed in the same manner. The third key, he claimed, was east, the fourth south, the fifth west, the sixth key north, and so on around and around with the next twelve keys.

I agree, given Dee's invocations, that this may indeed be how he might have interpreted the keys. I am also willing to agree that the Enochian calls or keys are directional, and not elemental as such. But even Jones admitted he usually had to move the watchtowers around to make it work. I feel the directional cube offers a simpler, more consistent solution.


“The Round Table of Nalvage”, MS Cotton Appendix's I, leaf 74 (front).

The ‘0’ key is from the “Round Table of Nalvage”, and, as we shall later see, “a place set within a place” is a peculiarly appropriate description of that table. It seems to be a natural choice for the center of the cube.

The first Enochian key is ‘up’. In the GD scheme of things it invoked the “Tablet of Union”. In my experience, and that of others, this first key acts rather like an eraser. I use it first most anytime I use Enochian keys.

The second key is ‘down’. In the GD system this key invoked the left-most column of the “Tablet of Union”. This key is an instrument of division. I only use it with the seventh through the eighteenth keys, as it appears to subdivide the quadrants into their four sub-quadrants.

Continuing in order the third key is east, the fourth key west. The fifth key is north and the sixth key I believe is south.

When we use this directional cube to determine the directions in which we place the watchtowers, we get the arrangement of Kelly's vision. When we use the directional cube to determine the directions of the keys, we get (effectively) the traditional elemental attributions we inherited through the Golden Dawn. For me, this is enough consistency to set up the watchtower of air in the east, that of water in the west, the watchtower of earth in the north, and that of fire in the south, perhaps even in that order. And, should I choose, I feel confident in using the Golden Dawn's interpretation of the keys as a means of doing so.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2019, 05:43:01 PM by Satyr »

Satyr

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #25 on: September 29, 2019, 07:07:35 PM »
This is interesting to me, because it was recently explained to me that that's the reason why I have so many 'rest days' (aethyrs where little happens), where I am charged and stuff, in order to maintain momentum into the following aethyrs.

And this is why you are a bit ragged, right now.

pantare

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #26 on: September 29, 2019, 09:02:07 PM »
This most recent lesson has been helpful, especially as the Seniors are next on my list. I'm glad that we've arrived back to the GD style order because it's familiar, but I'm not sure how that jives with what you said about placing the Secret Names of God.

Quote
Then move to a little west of south, face outward, and vibrate “pdoce” five times. And so on in like manner around the circle, vibrating “mor” south of west, “dial” in the west, “hctga” north of west, “mph” west of north, “arsl” in the north, and “gaiol” east of north.
Ending with MPH ARSL GAIOL in the north would place the Water tablet there. Is this an error?

A few thoughts, then questions: the LRP incorporates the recension Z-order of Air Water Earth Fire, and the standard GD order of Air Fire Water Earth. During the pentagram portion we're following GD, but we call the angels in the Z. When it comes to building the circle, using GD's order makes sense to me because of the deosil momentum, but I don't know what symbolic value the Z order may add.

Regardie's Opening by Watchtower goes for IHVH instead, and I see value in that but I don't know ultimately which pattern is most useful. I'm leaning towards the Z because it fits into the Key order and that harmony seems helpful while working in an enochian context.

Also, is the Fundamental Prayer enough to set up the Watchtowers before further work as opposed to something like the Opening by Watchtower?

Another question is if the first key acts as an eraser, should or could it be used at the end of a rite as a banishment of sorts?

As always, thank you for your help. This is genuinely instructional.

Nubti

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2019, 10:04:53 PM »
The Z-order (Air, Fire, Water, Earth) corresponds (roughly) to the sephiroth - Tiphareth, Netzach, Hod, and Yesod (being the lens through which we experience Malkuth).

This places the cross, the middle space, between the paths of Samek and Pe.

Of course, we could make an argument that that isn't really true... but most ritual is performed more astrally than physically - thus the arrangement works.

pantare

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2019, 10:14:11 PM »
Are you talking about Dee's first table, Surgo? Cause Raphael's table shows Air Water Earth Fire in the Z order, no? Not to mention that Isod generally corresponds to air not earth so that doesn't make sense to me.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 10:18:45 PM by pantare »

Nubti

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Re: Ceremonial Magic 201 - Introduction to Enochian
« Reply #29 on: September 29, 2019, 10:17:14 PM »
I'm talking about the LBRP. I'm kinda fuckered today, ARN took a lot out of me, so I wasn't thinking super-straight.
And I'm aware the direct attribution of Yesod is Air; I'm talking about it as the prism through which the other Sephiroth manifest Malkuth.